Last edited by Arashisida
Sunday, August 2, 2020 | History

1 edition of Letter from the principal agent for Indian affairs, south of the Ohio found in the catalog.

Letter from the principal agent for Indian affairs, south of the Ohio

by Benjamin Hawkins

  • 271 Want to read
  • 4 Currently reading

Published by s.n. in Washington, D.C.? .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Creek Indians,
  • Indians of North America,
  • Government relations

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesCopy of a letter from Benjamin Hawkins.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination11 p. ;
    Number of Pages11
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL24983747M
    OCLC/WorldCa2486654

      Report on Indian Affairs () Indian trade, with a clause strictly prohibiting all civil and military officers and particularly all Commissioners and Agents for Indian affairs, from trading with the Indians or purchasing or being directly or indirectly concerned in purchasing lands from the Indians, except only by the express license and. Hawkins served under George Washington as General Superintendent for Indian Affairs (–) and had responsibility for the Native American tribes south of the Ohio River, and was principal Indian agent to the Creek Indians.

    The documents include letters from special Indian agents, reports to Congress, and records pertaining to Indian-White relations. Researchers should consult the volumes pertaining to military affairs as well as those relating to Indian affairs. Each volume has an index. Available via the Library of Congress Web site. Also available via HeinOnline. Kendall Lewis was the son-in-law of Big Warrior,* Chief of the Upper Creek Indians from until when he died in Washington. In , Lewis was a Lieutenant of Scouts in the service of Col. Benjamin Hawkins, United States Agent for Indian affairs South of the Ohio River.

    The Office of Indian Affairs, Historical Sketches. New York, New York: Clearwater Publishing Company, Inc., Historical Sketches for Jurisdictional and Subject Headings Used for the Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, National Archives Microcopy T Hodge, Frederick Webb. In , Washington appointed Benjamin Hawkins as General Superintendent of Indian Affairs, dealing with all tribes south of the Ohio River. As principal agent to the Creek tribe, Hawkins moved to present-day Crawford County in Georgia. After he was adopted by the Creeks, he took a common-law wife from among the women.


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Letter from the principal agent for Indian affairs, south of the Ohio by Benjamin Hawkins Download PDF EPUB FB2

=av No. L OF D O C U M E N T S AccornpuJiying the President's Commu?ucatio7is to Congress^ the 8lb day of December^ ISOL Letter from the Principal Agent for Indian affairs.

South of the Ohio. Get this from a library. Letter from the principal agent for Indian Affairs, south of the Ohio. [Benjamin Hawkins]. Letter from the principal agent for Indian affairs, south of the Ohio.

By Benjamin Hawkins. Abstract. 11 p. Topics: Creek Indians., Indians of North America--Government relations., Indians of North Author: Benjamin Hawkins. Hawkins was United States agent for Indian affairs south of the Ohio River during the period covered by the letters.

"Benjamin Hawkins"; biographical sketch by S.B. Weeks: p. [5] Description: pages illustrations 26 cm. Series Title: Collections (Georgia Historical Society), v.

"Hawkins was United States agent for Indian affairs south of the Ohio River during the period covered by the letters." Search for More Keyword Title Subject Author. His position as Superintendent of Indian Affairs put him in contact with all tribes south of the Ohio River.

As principal agent to the Creek tribe, Hawkins moved to present-day Crawford County in. letters much to the satisfaction of the People. I therefore take leave to mention him to you as a person who from his knowledge of the language & custom of those people, is capable of being usefull to the interests of th e United States in those parts, if employed under the superintendants as an agent for Indian Size: 1MB.

Benjamin Hawkins was an American planter, statesman, and U.S. Indian agent. He was a delegate to the Continental Congress and a United States Senator from North Carolina, having grown up among the planter elite.

Appointed by George Washington as General Superintendent for Indian Affairs, he had responsibility for the Native American tribes south of the Ohio River, and was principal Indian agent Political party: Pro-Administration (–), Anti.

(C) An agent that acts in good faith is not liable to any beneficiary of the principal's estate plan for failure to preserve the plan.

(D) An agent that acts with care, competence, and diligence for the best interest of the principal is not liable solely because the agent also benefits from the act or has an individual or conflicting interest in relation to the property or affairs of the principal.

Footnotes. The other two surviving letters are Oliver Cowdery, Independence, MO, to the Church in Ohio, 29 Jan. in Letter to Hyrum Smith, 3–4 March ; and Letter from Oliver Cowdery, 8 Apr. Williams was present in Missouri with Cowdery when this letter was written and thus had firsthand knowledge of what addressee was listed on the original packet.

"In U.S. president George Washington appointed Benjamin Hawkins as "Principal Temporary Agent for Indian Affairs South of the Ohio River," a position he held until his death in Hawkins was born on Augin present-day Warren County, North Carolina, to a wealthy family.

is named for Colonel Benjamin Hawkins, who served as the principal temporary agent for Indian affairs south of the Ohio River from untilwhen he became the principal agent for the s's close relationship with the Creek Nation—he lived among them and eventually married a Creek woman—helped to preserve peace between the Native American people and the.

These items are listed as 50 Autograph Letters and Documents Pertaining to Indians in the Territory South of the River Ohio. They are almost all letters and documents addressed to or written by Col.

David Henley. He was the Agent for the War Department in charge of Indian affairs based in Knoxville, Tennessee. The Correspondents include. Letter from John Ross, The Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation, to a Gentleman of Philadelphia (), by Eastern Cherokees in the Indian Territory, contrib.

by United States Senate Committee on Indian Affairs. multiple formats at ; page images at HathiTrust Cherokee Indians -- Wars, Indian Wars in North. Handwritten copies of letters to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, agents, and others. Arranged chronologically.

For earlier copies of letters sent, see entry For later copies of letters sent, beginning insee entries and See also the letters received and copies of letters sent that are described in entry At a Congress of the Principal Chiefs & Warriers of the Cherokee Nation of Indians, Held at hard labour, in the Province of South Carolina the fourteenth day of October in the Year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred & sixty eight, by John Stewart Esq r his Majesty's Agent for and Superintendant of the affairs of the Indian Nations in the Southern district of North Carolina.

U.S. president George Washington appointed Benjamin Hawkins as "Principal Temporary Agent for Indian Affairs South of the Ohio River," a position he held until his death in The city of Hawkinsville, the seat of Pulaski County, is named in his honor. Hawkins was a federal commissioner for Indian negotiations in the late s, before being elected senator from North Carolina in But he soon returned to his work among the Indians and was named “Principal Temporary Agent for Indian Affairs South of the Ohio River” by President Washington in.

In a confidential letter to the head of the Bureau of Indian Affairs in Washington, he wrote that the missions were actually intended to teach the Indians to distinguish between "Mormons" and. (record group 75) overview of records locations table of contents administrative history records of the office of the secretary of war relating to indian affairs records of the office of indian trade general records of the bureau of indian affairs records of the commissioner of indian affairs and his immediate.

Indian Affairs Extends Deadline for the National Tribal Broadband Grant Program. Thursday, Ap | Online Press Releases. Office of the Assistant Secretary – Indian Affairs Statement on the Coronavirus Relief Fund Process. More News. Find your BIA Region. Records created by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) document the U.S.

Federal government’s interaction with American Indians. Enlarge Chemawa Indian School Baseball Team, National Archives Identifier: Though administrative in nature, the records can include: Account ledgers Case files Censuses Correspondence Enrollments Estate cards Issuances Leases Reports .papers of U.S.

Agent for Indian Affairs Col. Benjamin Hawkins. A letter written by the agent during the late summer of reports that Weatherford was taken prisoner by the Red Sticks at the Battle of Burnt Corn Creek, Alabama. If this claim is correct, then he joined .